Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world

"This volume brings together studies on Greek animal sacrifice by foremost experts in Greek language, literature and material culture. Readers will benefit from the synthesis of new evidence and approaches with a re-evaluation of twentieth-century theories on sacrifice. The chapters range acros...

Ausführliche Beschreibung

Ort/Verlag/Jahr: Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 2017.
Umfang/Format: 348 pages : illustrations.
Schlagworte:
Weitere Ausgaben: Animal sacrifice in the ancient Greek world. [Print]
Online Zugang: Online available (Cambridge Core)
Zusammenfassung: "This volume brings together studies on Greek animal sacrifice by foremost experts in Greek language, literature and material culture. Readers will benefit from the synthesis of new evidence and approaches with a re-evaluation of twentieth-century theories on sacrifice. The chapters range across the whole of antiquity and go beyond the Greek world to consider possible influences in Hittite Anatolia and Egypt, while an introduction to the burgeoning science of osteo-archaeology is provided. The twentieth-century emphasis on sacrifice as part of the Classical Greek polis system is challenged through consideration of various ancient perspectives on sacrifice as distinct from specific political or even Greek contexts. Many previously unexplored topics are covered, particularly the type of animals sacrificed and the spectrum of sacrificial ritual, from libations to lasting memorials of the ritual in art"--Provided by publisher.
"The prominence of heavily burnt thighbones and tail vertebrae in the altar assemblages from Isthmia and Kommos clearly identify them as the remains of thysiai, but the presence also of other parts of the victims suggest that we here encounter local variations of the execution of this ritual. The god's share placed in the altar fire was modified by the burning of a greater variety of bones from the victims. If we compare the deposits from Isthmia and Kommos with the burnt remains from the Aire sacrificielle at Eretria, for example, there is a stark contrast, as the burnt bones of that assemblage consisted to 93% of thighbones, kneecaps and the occasional tail vertebra"--Provided by publisher.
Bibliographie: Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
ISBN: 9781139017886 (e-book)